tvSmarter

www.tvSmarter.com – Life in a TV Nation


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Turn-off Week 2014, May 5-11

Screen Free Week 2014

Screen Free Week 2014

 

CCFC had another excellent screen turn-off week May 5-11, 2014.

http://www.screenfree.org/

The emphasis was on families going screen free for a week (or at least going low-screen for a week).

 

My favorite write-up was by Traci McGrath. She described how her children have already gone low-TV, watching only about 1 hour per day, and how she was dreading losing that hour per day of uninterrupted time to get things done. But as it happened, things turned out much better than she anticipated:

“I try to make it a habit not to ‘entertain’ the kids all the time. I believe in giving them lots of opportunities to solve their own boredom with creativity – but during Screen Free Week, I hardly had the opportunity to push this little soap box of mine at all. They were so tapped into their own creativity, they were no longer coming to me to ask me what they could do, and they completely forgot to ask if they could “watch a show” (a question I’m used to fielding 2 or 3 times a day.) We still made a point to play together, but it was almost always the case that I was simply invited in to join a game they had invented or go on a scavenger hunt they had created.”

http://www.simplicityparenting.com/the-surprise-plot-twist-in-our-screen-free-week-why-eliminating-screens-made-life-easier/

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Screen-Free Week Feedback


I should have posted this earlier, but here is some of the excellent feedback that CCFC received after the 2012 Screen-Free Week:

“It was WONDERFUL! We are vowing screen-free afternoons for as long as we can do it . . . fewer meltdowns and a happier family!!”


“It was refreshing. I got more sleep ( . . . and realized I am too much of a slave to staying on top of FB and Twitter) . . . . we dusted off “Clue” and “Trouble” instead of watching a movie during family time . . . the boys chatted with us (and each other) a bit more and spontaneously practiced the piano (perhaps a first . . . ). I think our younger son “detoxed” because he had fewer emotional outbursts. We did notice how “screens” are so woven into our everyday lives, and we needed to use the computer and iPad for work and research—but even this recognition was useful.”


“I’m planning on doing this at least every season! I finished so many neglected projects!”
“What a great screen-free week! I enjoyed distraction-free conversation with my family, more time outdoors, finding fun things to do in my community, and caught up on reading my Alaska Magazine. I will be seriously cutting my screen time from now on. I challenged my kindergarten class to do the same with their families and heard about the great things they are doing instead. Great week!”


“I can honestly say it was one of the most connecting weeks I’ve ever spent with my son (almost 4) since he was born. We did SO much fun stuff together. Overall, I just felt so much more in the moment than I normally find myself. And I know Lucas actually enjoyed it . . . when I told him yesterday we had come to the end of our week, he asked me if we could keep doing it. Going to try to take some of the changes we made and apply them long-term on a daily basis.”

From http://www.facebook.com/screenfreeweek

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Libraries – Do They Matter?

With the internet becoming the major source for research and entertainment, are libraries even relevant any more?

Definitely yes, for a number of reasons.

For young children, libraries are essential for developing a love of reading. With so many schools grimly focused on testing and improved test-scores, reading-for-fun has too often been taken out of the school day as an inefficient use of time. But as Dr. Krashen has demonstrated in his excellent book “The Power of Reading”, kids become skilled readers when they learn to love reading, that is when they read-for-fun. The secret of reading-for-fun is having a peaceful place to read, and having access to an array of fun books to choose from. This happens to be a perfect description of a library!

In fact, studies back this up:

“Elley found the availability of books is a key factor in reading achievement. He studied the reading achievement of children in 32 countries and found that factors which consistently differentiated high-scoring and low-scoring countries were large school libraries, large classroom libraries, regular book borrowing, frequent silent reading in class, and frequent story reading aloud by teachers. The highest scoring countries typically provide their students with greater access to books in the home, in nearby community libraries and book stores, and in the school.”

“Krashen found a significant positive correlation between each (U.S.) state’s 1992 fourth-grade reading comprehension scores on the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) and the number of books per students in school libraries (p.<01) as well as library use (p<.01), regardless of how much money the state spent on education per pupil. The findings suggest that for money spent on education to effect reading scores it needs to be invested in library books.”

http://www.edresearch.info/access.asp

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Screen-Free Week – 2012 – April 30 to May 6

Screen-Free Week – April 30 to May 6

The 2012 Screen-Free week is coming up – April 30 to May 6

Campaign For A Commercial-Free Childhood now has free organizing kits available for anyone interested in organizing Screen-Free activities (or who are just curious). Click here to go to their download page and the pdf will be emailed to you.

Later on, the CCFC will have a list of Screen-Free Week activities around the country, and you will be able to see what is going on in your community.

I read through their organizing pdf “Screen-Free Organizers’ Kit” and was very impressed with what they have put together. Which includes:

– Inspiring quotes from previous Screen-Free weeks (including an excellent quote from President Obama).

– Reproducible Fact sheets to give out when organizing (and during) your Screen-Free Week activities. Includes a FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) Fact Sheet.

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Living Outside the Box – Book Review

Kids playing by Philou.cn
Kids playing, a photo by Philou.cn on Flickr.


Barbara Brock surveyed over 500 Low-TV and No-TV families, and further interviewed a number of these families in person. The result is her interesting and excellent book “Living Outside the Box”. Why have these families given up TV ? What do they do with their time? Are they social outcasts? These are some of the questions Barbara Brock seeks to answer.

What I found most fascinating were the reasons given for living TV-Free. Basically these reasons could be put into four broad categories:

– Resentment and Frustration. Resentment at being raised with too much TV and/or frustration with their own families being too TV oriented.

– Technical Difficulties. TVs breaking down, or moving to an area with poor TV reception. And finding the resulting TV-Free existence to be liberating instead of boring.

– Outside Prompts. Inspirations such as TV-Turnoff Week, Waldorf Schools, and books about the negative effects of TV.

– Raised Without TV. The stereotype is that children raised without TV will become total TV addicts when given the opportunity. As it turns out, growing up without TV was also a major reason for living TV-Free as adults.


And what I liked best about this book was that in addition to facts and figures, Outside the Box is also filled with stories from the interviews and feedback. My favorite story was about Jenny, a mom who would labor over a family dinner and then have to tear her kids and husband away from their separate TVs for a family get-together dinner. Finally, out of frustration, she took the garden shears and literally cut the TV cable. Her youngest son started to cry, her two daughters quickly took off to a friend’s TV-filled house, and her husband just stared in amazement. Now, years later, and still TV free, family dinners have become unhurried and filled with conversation, the kids have found lots to do, and even her husband has discovered that “at least now I know as much about my own kids as I used to know about The Simpsons”.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/605367.Living_Outside_the_Box


See also:

30 days live pdf
Found at ebookbrowse.com



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90 Days Without a Cell Phone, Email, Social Media and TV Too

Jake Reilly decided to go three months without a Cell Phone, Email, Social Media and TV. He felt that he and his friends were almost always communicating electronically, he wanted to get back to face-to-face friendship.

“I ride my bike a lot, so, I’d ride my bike over to people’s houses and leave them messages in chalk on their sidewalk. I set up a couple of systems with people where, when they got home, they would put something in the window, like a stuffed dog, or put a pumpkin up on the ledge that meant “Hey, I’m here. Come talk.” I started having fun trying to dream up different ways to get people’s attention.”

He did end up going back to social media, but the old-fashioned kind, the written kind:

You posted several of the notes you received from friends during your isolation. One note read “Jake, I’m pregnant. Call me.” What was that about?

Reilly: Ha! At the school, there’s an elevator. No matter where you’re going, everyone has to use the elevator on the ground floor. So, for the people that I went to school with, that was the first place we’d post projects or memes. I didn’t say this is my message board, but one of the girls just started leaving messages, like, “Hey. I’m on the fourth floor. Come find me,” or “Jake, where are you?” It’s a very public forum, so everybody can read it. It became my message spot.

Then, people almost treated it like a Facebook wall. It evolved from leaving messages for each other, to joking around, like, “Jake, your mother called. She said she doesn’t love you anymore,” and “Jake, the cops are looking for you,” and all this stuff. It turned into a funny thing.”

http://news.yahoo.com/90-days-without-cell-phone-email-social-media-015300257.html