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www.tvSmarter.com – Life in a TV Nation


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Why TV Undermines Academics & Values

 

Dr. Laura Markham has an excellent overview of the effects of TV, and why parents should limit, or even get rid of the TV.

Why TV Undermines Academics & Values

http://www.ahaparenting.com/parenting-tools/raise-great-kids/intellegent-creative-child/tv-compromises-academics

 

A sample from her article:

You recommend that kids don’t watch much, if any, TV. Why?

Because TV is addictive, and like all addictions, it has a high cost that we usually avoid acknowledging. Research shows that people who don’t watch TV are happier and healthier, have better self-esteem, and are less fearful.

Females who don’t watch TV have a healthier body image. This is all even more true for kids, because TV has a bigger impact on them. Not surprisingly, families who watch less TV are closer, and kids who see less TV become sexually active at a later age.

But let’s start with reading. We know that kids who love to read do better in school. Virtually all parents say they want their children to love reading, but most kids stop reading books that aren’t assigned in school by middle school. Only 28 percent of eighth graders score at or above the proficiency level in reading; in fact, only two percent of them read at an advanced level. What happens?

TV and reading are linked: Research shows that the more TV kids watch before the age of eight, the less they read after the age of eight. Of course, that’s a correlation, so it doesn’t prove that one leads to the other, but most researchers are convinced. If you want your children to be readers, don’t let them get addicted to TV and videos. Time spent on the one activity precludes the other. And once kids develop the habit of TV, they are less likely to seek out books of their own accord. Books — which are more work — just can’t compete with the lure of the screen.

  

I really like her question and answer format, some of the other questions are:

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New Links

 

I’ve just updated www.tvSmarter.com with a lot of new links.

Note: I also took down the “Screen-Free Week” banner (until next year), so if it still shows up on tvSmarter, just click on refresh and any new links will then show up.

Here is a small sampling:

 

Blog Posts Linking to tvSmarter:

“Living Now – Television as a child development hazard”

http://www.livingnow.com.au/advertise/articles/20-issues/4347-television-as-a-child-development-hazard.html

“Junk Culture Manifesto – Quick Note On Self-Esteem & Television or Stop Exposing Yourself to Consumer Culture!”

http://junkculturemanifesto.blogspot.com/2008/04/quick-note-on-self-esteem-television-or.html

 

Overview:

Natural News – Television

http://www.naturalnews.com/television.html

Kids and TV:

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Libraries – Do They Matter?

With the internet becoming the major source for research and entertainment, are libraries even relevant any more?

Definitely yes, for a number of reasons.

For young children, libraries are essential for developing a love of reading. With so many schools grimly focused on testing and improved test-scores, reading-for-fun has too often been taken out of the school day as an inefficient use of time. But as Dr. Krashen has demonstrated in his excellent book “The Power of Reading”, kids become skilled readers when they learn to love reading, that is when they read-for-fun. The secret of reading-for-fun is having a peaceful place to read, and having access to an array of fun books to choose from. This happens to be a perfect description of a library!

In fact, studies back this up:

“Elley found the availability of books is a key factor in reading achievement. He studied the reading achievement of children in 32 countries and found that factors which consistently differentiated high-scoring and low-scoring countries were large school libraries, large classroom libraries, regular book borrowing, frequent silent reading in class, and frequent story reading aloud by teachers. The highest scoring countries typically provide their students with greater access to books in the home, in nearby community libraries and book stores, and in the school.”

“Krashen found a significant positive correlation between each (U.S.) state’s 1992 fourth-grade reading comprehension scores on the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) and the number of books per students in school libraries (p.<01) as well as library use (p<.01), regardless of how much money the state spent on education per pupil. The findings suggest that for money spent on education to effect reading scores it needs to be invested in library books.”

http://www.edresearch.info/access.asp

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